Tag Archives: weird

Monday Afternoon – Break For A Laugh

Props to good friend and BRAND NEW BLOGGER Stephanie Pereida for this brilliant Monday afternoon post.

Advertisements

Alternate Arrangements…

While sitting in ‘Sweet Tomatoes’ with Ryan, Jason, Matt Maher and Kenny Butler, earlier this week, the dialogue was started about songs we think could work acousticly. We then talked about songs that really maybe couldn’t be changed from their original format. We all had a few thoughts and then the legendary Matt Maher (if you don’t know who Matt is…he wrote the song ‘Your Grace is Enough’…no Chris Tomlin didn’t write that…the genius Matt Maher did…give him credit!) just mentioned that the Hillsong United tune ‘Break Free’ was one of those songs.

Well, later in the week we just could not refuse the chance to prove Matt Maher wrong. So we did and here’s what we came up with for it. Also, don’t forget to watch the bonus video of the acoustic version of ‘Your Grace is Enough’. I’ll just say in advance, you won’t be able to ‘get enough’ of this goodness. Let me know what you thought…leave a comment! 🙂

FOR ONE OF MATT’S BRIGHTER MOMENTS:

OKEY-DOKEY

if you’re like me you’ve been dying to know what the heck this word means. well…now we can finally know why our Uncle Ray and Aunt Jackie always say this word and what it actually means. HAHA!

Okey-dokey?!

Meaning

Okay. There are some late 20th century alternative meanings, limited to the USA, e.g. ‘absurd or ridiculous’ and ‘to swindle or deceive’.

Origin

This little phrase is a variant of okay. It is 20th century American and first appears in print in a 1932 edition of American Speech.

okily-dokilyThere are several alternative spellings – okay-doke, okey-doke, okee-doke, etc. In addition to these is the comic version that has brought the phrase back to popular attention in recent years – The Simpson’s Ned Flanders’ ‘okely-dokely’.

All of them are just a perky reduplicated variants of okay, utilizing that favourite device of two-word phrases – rhyming. As a reduplication it is properly spelled with a hyphen, although it is often given without.

Like okay, ‘okey-doke’ is used to indicate that all is well, e.g. ‘everything is okay here’, but may be used when responding positively to a request. That is exemplified in this piece from Colin MacInnes’ book City of Spades, 1957:

“One Guinness stout, right, I thank you, okey-doke, here it is.